March Pānui, 2019 March 2019

Tuia te muka tangata ki uta

Tuia te muka tangata ki uta

Toward the end of this year, Aotearoa New Zealand will acknowledge 250 years since the first sustained onshore meetings between Māori and Pākehā with a national commemoration called Tuia – Encounters 250 (Tuia 250). Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō, along with our Kurahaupō whanaunga and Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui, has been involved with the local Trust formed to organise Tuia 250 events in Marlborough, one of four sites identified as being of particular significance nationwide.  One of the main aspects of the commemorations will be a large flotilla made up of vaka, waka hourua tall ships, which will travel around the country, stopping at sites of significance – one of those being Tōtaranui/Queen Charlotte Sound. As mana whenua in the Sounds, the four iwi will play a significant role in welcoming and showing manaaki to the flotilla manuhiri. While event plans have yet to be officially announced, we’re asking you to keep your diaries free in late November. We’d love to get as many of you here and participating in the events as possible – this is a major Tier 1 national...

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Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō, Hoe Kia Rite!

Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō, Hoe Kia Rite!

Grab your lifejackets whānau – we’ve got good news. At the end of last year, on the sidelines of the consultation hui for the Five-Year Plan, we floated the idea of building a waka tāngata and focusing our cultural programme for the year on the associated mātauranga Māori. We received really good feedback and so have been looking to external partners to help fund this kaupapa. At the end of February we learned we had been successful in applying to the Lotteries Tuia Encounters 250 fund, and are now in a position to be able to build our own waka tāngata. We’ve set up a project team, to be led by cultural advisor Kiley Nepia and including master waka craftsman Quentin Roake and our very own trustee and master carver Fayne Robinson, who will carve the Tauihu and the Taurapa of the waka, and trustee and master weaver Margaret Bond. The name of this kaupapa - Ngāti Apa ki Te Rā Tō, Hoe Kia Rite - encourages the descendants of Ngāti Apa to once again physically and metaphorically pick up the...

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From the Chair

From the Chair

Kia ora whānau, An appropriate word for me to start this month with, is ‘kotahitanga’, which most of you will know means unity, togetherness, solidarity, and/or collective action. This past month has seen a number of examples of this in action. The first is the fires. Over the past month we in Nelson have seen the devastation of the bush fires, originating in Pigeon Valley and spreading rapidly from there. A number of our whānau living in the affected areas were forced to evacuate their homes. Very early in the emergency, the iwi of Tauihu stood up to respond, and through a wide range of activity, made an immediate and lasting impact: Te Pūtahitanga navigators were assigned and worked on the ground supporting evacuees throughout the emergency, the Māori warden network assisted where required, marae were opened to give evacuees a temporary home and two iwi liaison officers were mandated by iwi, to work with the Nelson Tasman Civil Defence Emergency Management team. At a hui with Minister Nanaia Mahuta, Tasman Mayor Richard Kempthorne stated in an emotional speech that the game...

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Spotlight on education

Spotlight on education

Caitlin Huria is one of 23 Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō Trust Education Grant recipients for 2018. Caitlin is in her first year at Auckland University, studying Health Science.

Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou Kia ora, I’m Caitlin Huria. I am 17 and from Waikanae on the Kapiti Coast. My parents are Roland and Leanne Huria. I have an older brother Liam and younger sister, Hannah. My Koro is Hata Peter Huria and my Nan is Horahuia Huria from Hokio Beach. I am a descendent of Hoani Mahuika. I was a competitive swimmer and played senior netball and basketball at Kapiti College. In September of 2017, my interest and passion to pursue a career in the health sector was ignited when, during our annual basketball game with Paraparaumu College, I tore my anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in my left knee after three minutes on the court. For a young, sporty and inquisitive woman this was very much a life-changing event. Seeing the support from the surgeons and sports medics and caring staff gave me a humbling understanding of what a difference these professionals can make in the community. So began my interest in Health Science. I have just started at Auckland University and am studying a Foundation Certificate in Health Science. I am...

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