December Pānui, 2018 December 2018

From the Chair

From the Chair

Kia ora e te whānau, Firstly, a big thank you to those who were able to make it along to our recent series of consultation hui. I appreciate that it is a busy time of the year which made it difficult for many to attend, however it was great to get your constructive feedback and great ideas around engagement, and we will certainly incorporate many of those into the plan. Thanks also to those of you who emailed your responses to us. From here we will now tweak the draft we took out, then plan next year’s specific activity which will enable Simon and the office team to resource the work program for the next financial year. Last month I attended the official blessing and launch, of Sealord’s latest acquisition, Tokatu, a purpose-designed and built fishing vessel.  Sealord have invested $70 million into this project, which is testament to its ongoing commitment to the industry. The vessel is state of the art in a number of different ways, from the technology to sail and operate the vessel, the ability to track, find...

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Sign up now for Mana Rangatahi ki Kaiteriteri

Sign up now for Mana Rangatahi ki Kaiteriteri

Mana Rangatahi ki Kaiteriteri Monday, January 14 to Saturday, January 19, 2019 *Registrations are now open for the summer edition of our flagship Mana Rangatahi programme.* mana logo2018 Now in its fifth year, Mana Rangatahi is nationally recognised as a leader in cultural development and revitalisation. But more than that, it’s a fun and rewarding way for rangatahi to connect with their iwi - and also to one another. The next wānanga will take place in Kaiteriteri from Monday, January 14 to Saturday, January 19. It’s open to all registered iwi members aged 12 to 24, however, younger rangatahi will be considered upon parental request. If you haven’t been to a wānanga before, that’s OK – we understand that all our rangatahi are at different stages of their cultural journey and make sure that we are there alongside them, from the very start. Perhaps you or a family member has taken part in a Mana Rangatahi wānanga before – we’d love to have you back. January’s wānanga will have a focus on waka ama and ancestral games in addition to core cultural learning and experiences....

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High achiever

High achiever

Tui-Aroha Fransen is making her whānau proud. Tui-Aroha, who has just completed year 10 student at Newlands College in Wellington, was recently named the recipient of the college’s Mauri Tū Tewha Award for Highest Achieving Junior Māori Student. She was also noted for academic excellence in te reo Māori, health and physical education. Tui-Aroha is the daughter of Craig and Tania Fransen and moko of Arohanui Fransen (nee Pene), who is the daughter of Pipiwharauroa Pene (nee Huntly).  Tui-Aroha’s aunty, Dee Rennie, tells us Tui-Aroha is a proud Apanesian, who always represents the iwi well. Ka mau te wehi Tui-Aroha - we look forward to seeing what great things you achieve next!

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Go Ihaia!

Go Ihaia!

He’s been a stand-out performer on the league field since he was 6 years old, and now young iwi member Ihaia Puohotaua is cleaning up on the athletics field as well. Ihaia, son of Yani and Willie Puohotaua and mokopuna of Mahara Gilsenan, recently represented the Sunshine Coast at the Queensland State Athletic Championships in Cairns. Taking on the 100m sprint and the 4x100m relay, Ihaia won his 100m heat, qualifying him for the semi-final. He placed third in that, making it to the finals where he ran a personal best of 13.64sec and placed sixth – the sixth fastest 10-year-old boy in Queensland!  Ihaia, who has lived on the Sunshine Coast since 2012, has shown his dad’s talent on the league field as well. He’s been playing since he was 6, scoring 50 to 60 tries a season, and made the Caboolture District Rugby League side for 10- and 11-year-olds when he was just 9. His dad, Willie, played league for the Junior Kiwis and NZ Māori and signed with the Parramatta Eels in 2003-4. He also had a stint with...

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Forging connections

Forging connections

Tēnā koutou katoa e te whānau As we approach the end of a busy year, I reflect on the many whānau connections I have been privileged to make, face to face, by email and the many phone calls. I want to warmly acknowledge your generosity and interest in sharing information and your passion for whānau and whakapapa. It has been a year of much research and enlightenment with information about some of our Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō tūpuna coming to light for the first time. Since starting in this role, my work has involved identifying and sorting through many whakapapa documents from within our archive and from personal collections, identifying the source of the information (where the source is identified) assigning a number and description, entering it into a database, developing procedures for appropriate storage and retrieval. Using information from our member database, we have begun compiling the whakapapa we hold into a format that can be shared with whānau in the future in a variety of settings.  We will then work through a process with whānau, to identify any discrepancies and...

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