February Pānui, 2018 February 2018

From the Chair

From the Chair

Kia ora e whānau.

I want firstly, to pass on my appreciation to Hinemoa (Conner) for agreeing to step up and cover things in my absence during October and November last year. The formal appointment to the Deputy Chairperson role has been delayed a little while we work through a technical matter. I expect we will be in a position to fill the role, around April. It was good to hear that there were good attendances at the two hapū Christmas parties held late last year, and that both events were well organised by the two Hapū. Well done to both of the organising teams. Other than our recently appointed Whakapapa researcher breaking her leg, I understand both functions were appreciated and enjoyed by all, and otherwise went without incident. At the end of last month I attended the closing Pōwhiri for the participants on the Mana Rangatahi wānanga, and saw first-hand how their cultural capacity and awareness has grown since they started their respective programs. Well done again to Kiley and his support team, for organising these wānanga and for making them successful and enjoyable...

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GM Corner

GM Corner

Kia ora koutou

Ko ngā mihi ki a koutou i roto i ngā tini āhuatanga o te wā o te raumati. I hope everyone has had a restful and enjoyable break as you now return to school or work. The recent Waitangi Day celebrations on 6 February provided all of us with the opportunity to reflect upon our collective history and how our modern nation of Aotearoa/New Zealand came about. Te Tiriti was signed in a number of places around the country and on a number of “sheets”. One of those sheets was the Cook Strait sheet which was taken around by Henry Williams (the original translator of the Treaty) It is likely there were a number of rangatira who affiliated to Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō who signed the Treaty. There were signings of the Treaty at Rangitoto (D’Urville) Island on 11 May 1840 and Totaranui Queen Charlotte Sound on 4-5 May 1840. The Treaty remains a significant event for the birth of our modern nation and maintains a rightful place in our proud history. The fact it was developed and signed in...

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Apa ki te Rā Tōtanga

Apa ki te Rā Tōtanga

MANA RANGATAHI KI TĪTĪRANGI/ANAMĀHANGA The first Mana Rangatahi wānanga of 2018 was held in the Christmas school holidays. This time the wānanga travelled down into the Marlborough Sounds to Tītīrangi and Anamāhanga. The participants went camping at Tītīrangi and the first task was to erect the tents. It was beautiful weather and there was a lot of swimming and gathering of kaimoana. There was also tough taiaha training on the beach every day. Uncle Matt Baker took the rōpū around for a site visit to some really old mara kai, gardens and then up a very steep hill to some ancient kumara pits. Uncle Matt and Nana Marg shared with the rangatahi our history and association to Anamāhanga. It was a very emotional time for Uncle Matt as he welcomed his mokopuna home to what he refers to as the homelands. The rangatahi also got to see our maunga Puhi kererū, a first for most of them. During this wānanga we had a few new rangatahi join the kaupapa and the Ngā Toki Pakohe a Tamahau assisted Papa Kiley with tutoring. The...

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Education and Training

EDUCATION GRANTS Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō received 24 applications for Education Grants for the 2018 year. We are pleased to announce we were able to assist all the applicants in some way to support their further education. This included seven first year teriary students, three completing their doctorate’s, plus other applicants at various stages of completing their degrees. We wish them all the best for their year ahead and look forward to receiving their reports and feedback as the year continues.

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Taiao - Environment

Kia ora koutou, This is our second pānui as providers of Taiao services to Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō. 2018 is looking to be an exciting year for Iwi in the realm of Taiao with the new Labour led Government making interesting noises about the relationship of Māori to resource management. In February the Prime Minister will meet with the Iwi Chairs Forum which will set the tone of this relationship for the next three years. We have also been asked by some ministers to start providing advice on freshwater management later this year. This is an area where cultural values of rivers have been historically overlooked in RMA practice but whereby opportunities for better management regimes can now be considered. The Tasman District Council will soon begin its iwi engagement in the lead up to a new Environment Management Plan for the district. This is the Council which manages the majority of Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō statutory Acknowledgement Areas. We look forward to working with TDC and other iwi on this mahi which is expected to take place over...

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Whakapapa

Whakapapa

Mary Jane Wilson nee Mahuika  Mary Jane Wilson (nee Mahuika), was born in Westport on 10th of February 1908, ten minutes before her twin sister Sarah (who in later years married Leslie Addison). The second eldest daughter of Te Ahuru and Hinepare Mahuika (nee Bannister), her interests were tennis, swimming and badminton and she also played the banjo mandolin in the family band. As a young girl, Jane, along with her sisters, learnt to weave and make palala or paraerae (flax sandals) for the whānau. She was educated at Jacobs River School in South Westland. Her grandfather, a colonist named William Bannister, was headmaster of the school. He was one of a number of immigrants, who literally beat the māori culture and the reo out of his students - despite being married to Hera Te Koeti, a local māori woman and daughter of Chief, Te Koeti Turanga. Mary Jane left school when she was 12 years old to work for Condons, earning 5/- or 50 cents a week. She married William ‘Bill’ Wilson in 1926 at Hokitika.  Jane and Bill lived at...

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Te Kūmara Vine

FRANK AND MEGAN WELLS REUNION 23-28 DECEMBER 2017 Spanning four generations, we were fortunate to have 38 immediately whānau members attend our reunion in Whakatū. Staying at Te Ara Poutama (Nelson College) meant that we could maximise the time spent together. Highlights of the week included our visit Te Hora Marae where we were able to formally welcome whānau to the final resting place of Nana (Caroline Waiporo Hinera Hemi) and Grandad (Joseph Waihaere Wells). We also held workshops where Dad (Frank Wells) carved with the men and Mum (Megan Walker) baked with the ladies. One granddaughter wrote ““I feel as though my family has benefited greatly due to this reunion. My daughter and I have a better understanding of whakapapa and where our family is from.” We are grateful for the support we received from iwi and whānau and wish to acknowledge the contribution received from Ngāti Apa Ki Te Rā Tō.  Ngā mihi nui. Karen Wells Committee Member

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