October Pānui, 2018 October 2018

Here we come Whanganui!

Here we come Whanganui!

We’re hitting the road whānau, and this time we’re heading to Whanganui. Over the past couple of months, we’ve held informal ‘whānau cluster wānanga’ in Christchurch, Nelson and Blenheim to connect with iwi members and share Ngati Apa ki te Rā Tōtanga, and next up we’re in Whanganui. After Marlborough, the Manawatū-Whanganui area has the second biggest population of registered members and we’re hoping to see as many of you as possible at the Kingsgate Hotel (379 Victoria Ave) on Wednesday, October 31 at 6pm. Come and hang out with your Apa cousins and learn a little more about Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō. The hui is focused on whakawhanaungatanga and learning more about our culture and will be very informal, so you don’t need to worry if you haven’t got the reo or been to a wānanga before. Just come along and have fun. Kai will be provided.  You can register by giving us call at the office on *0800 578 900* or email Lynne Owen at administrator@ngatiapakiterato.iwi.nz[mailto:administrator@ngatiapakiterato.iwi.nz] Don’t be shy – we’d love to see you there.  

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Applications are open

Whaowhia te kete mātauranga – Fill the basket of knowledge. Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō Trust is now calling for Education Grant applications for the 2019 academic year. Any registered member enrolled or intending to enrol in tertiary study or trades training in the 2019 academic year is eligible to apply. If you would like Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō to consider assisting you with your course or accommodation costs for the year ahead please fill out the application form and return it by email to administrator@ngatiapakiterato.iwi.nz . You can also post it to: 78 Seymour Street, Blenheim, 7201. Alternatively, please contact the office on *0800 578 900* if you would like us to post you an application form. *The application period runs from Monday, October 15 to Saturday, December 1, 2018.* If you require any assistance or have any questions, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at the office on 0800 578 900. Please note that to be eligible for grant assistance, applicants must be registered with Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō, if you are not registered please click here[/registration/] to begin the...

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From the Chair

From the Chair

Kia ora whānau We are currently working on the times, dates and locations for our upcoming roadshows focusing on our Draft Five-Year Plan and will advise as soon as they are finalised. We are hoping to touch base with as many iwi members as possible – your feedback on the plan is invaluable. We’ll send more information our separately when booking have been confirmed. Meanwhile, Simon and I have started the process of engaging with the principals of the schools of which we are now the land owners and have received a very positive response so far. We have discussed the possibility of a cultural component with them, e.g. a mauri stone, which has been well received. Some are keen for us to assist them in their cultural journey by assisting them, for example, with appropriate te reo Māori names for classrooms.  We are continuing to work with the three councils across Te Tau Ihu  -  the Marlborough District Council, the Nelson City Council and the Tasman District Council  -  to form relationship agreements. With eight Iwi and three councils this is proving...

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A special gift

A special gift

It has sailed a different course to what was first envisaged, but a traditional hēra woven by Trustee Margaret Bond more than 32 years ago has found a new home. Work on the rā, or sail, started in 1986 – it was commissioned for a waka built to commemorate New Zealand’s sesquicentennial in 1990. Tribes throughout Aotearoa buillt waka to mark the occasion, including the tribes of Te Tauihu. The waka was eventually named Te Awatea Hou, a reference to the historical waka Te Awatea that once belonged to Ngati Apa ki te Rā Tō. However, tribal elder Kath Hemi opposed the use of that name and work on the sail ceased. Three decades on, Margaret has gifted the rā, made of harakeke, to Marlborough Museum, where it hangs alongside a waka carved by her great-grandfather Hemi Whiro in the 1870s. The official handover was made during an intimate family ceremony, with Margaret surrounded by three generations.  “I’m glad it is here, alongside our waka,” said Margaret. “I think today is significant. When our women are strong and believe in things, they don’t...

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My Backyard

My Backyard

Alice Gilsenan knows a thing or two about whitebaiting – she should, she’s been fishing on the banks of the Buller River for the past 42 years. Her mum, Hinemoa Gilsenan, and her grandmother Heni Mahuika were also keen whitebaiters, and a childhood spent growing up at Inangahua Flat in the Upper Buller is filled with memories of fishing for the famed white gold. It’s a beautiful day in Westport and the sun is sparkling on the Kawatiri. We’re at Alice’s place, not far from the river mouth. It’s a picturesque spot, one many of the dozens of whitebaiters crowded along the breakwater would happily trade their prized pozzie for. Bathed in sunshine, it’s a far cry from the inclement weather of February, which saw massive storm surges engulf dozens of homes in the area, including Alice’s. But that’s another story, we’re here for the bait. The season on the West Coast is a little shorter than elsewhere, running from September 1 to November 14. Throughout the rest of Aotearoa, fishers are allowed to put their nets in from August 15 to...

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Ngā taonga tuku iho

Ngā taonga tuku iho

Tuiti Makitanara, or Sweet MacDonald as he was known, was born at Havelock, Marlborough, on August 8, 1874. Tuiti was the second child and eldest son of Teoti (George) MacDonald and Rina Puhipuhi Meihana. He spent many years in the Wairau as a Native Land Agent, travelling between there and Koputaroa, in Levin. He and his wife Karaitiana, daughter of Te One McGregor, had 18 children, of which only eight survived. They were Tutepourangi (Adam), Karaitiana Kuao (Harai), Alfred Tuiti Hapareta (Chappy) Tauia, Toki Hori (George), Rina Puhipuhi (Lena), Te Aramakau Norua (Dave), and Ruanui Hamahona (Rua). He also had two other sons Hetaraka Anaru, and Puhi Te Rangiwhitikia o Te Ra MacDonald. Tuiti first stood for Parliament at the 1925 General Election as an independent candidate for Southern Maori, finishing second, 16 votes behind the incumbent, Henare Uru. At the 1928 General Election, Tuiti once again stood for the Southern Maori seat, this time as the candidate for the United Party. He was tied in the voting with the Rātana candidate, Eruera Tirikatene, but was elected on the casting vote of the returning...

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