July Pānui, 2019 July 2019

He hokinga mahara

He hokinga mahara

*Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō Trustee Denis Gapper says, although short, his journey on Te Awatea Hou was unforgettable.* Parked up on the shore of Rotoiti, watching as two waka filled with Ngāti Apa whānau disappear into the distance, kaumatua Denis Gapper can’t help but think about his own time as a kaihoe. He was a younger man then; it was 1990 and up to then he’d never seen a waka ply the waters of Tōtaranui (Queen Charlotte Sound). But Te Awatea Hou would change that. And for several years after her launch, everytime he was in Picton, he would make a special trip round the bay to where Te Awatea Hou was moored just to breathe in the sight. Built by Te Runanganui o Te Tau Ihu o te Waka a Māui, a confederation of the Tauihu tribes, for the 1990 150th Waitangi Day commemorations, the 20-tonne, 30-metre long waka made dozens of trips in the few years after her launch at Waikawa on January 20, 1990, involving hundreds of paddlers all up. One of those early voyages, in the autumn of...

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From the Chair

From the Chair

*Read the latest from Trust chairman Brendon Wilson.* Kia ora koutou, Late last month, on a crisp Friday morning, I attended a signing ceremony at the Trafalgar Centre in Nelson, for the recently finalised Kotahitanga mō te Taiao Strategy, which has been more than three years in the making and, as outlined in a previous pānui, is a collaboration between the Department of Conservation, iwi and the five councils in the wider Top of the South, (north of a line between Kaikoura and across to the West Coast). The date, July 28, was significant as we were also able to acknowledge and celebrate Matariki – the cold clear frosty conditions provided a stunning setting to do that. The Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage attended the signing along with iwi representatives, the mayors of Marlborough, Tasman and Nelson and council representatives from Kaikōura, Buller and the West Coast. The Alliance will now progress with the first of 11 identified projects, which is the Mt Richmond Place, a key aspect of which is to deal with wilding conifers, a significant issue in that area. We’ll highlight...

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Tokihi hi!

*The second wānanga to support the iwi’s waka tāngata kaupapa was held at Kaiteriteri from June 21 – 23, with about 40 iwi members and support crew braving the chilly but beautiful waters of Kaiteriteri.* And it was smiles all round as whānau young and old came together in the spirit of learning and whakawhanaungatanga. Big mihi to the whānau at Te Awhina Marae – who are always the most welcoming hosts – and also to the whānau at Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu, which is supporting these wānanga via Whānau Ora Wave 9 funding. The next Hoe Kia Rite wānanga will be focused on more intensive training of the crew who will take part in the Tuia 250 event at Meretoto in November. And of course, watch out for the launch of our waka tāngata at Rotoiti in October!

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Save the date!

Save the date!

This year the iwi’s Hui-a-Tau will be held on Sunday, September 22 at Omaka Marae in Blenheim. The hui will start at 10am and will be followed by lunch. We’ll also be holding an event for whānau prior to the AGM, on Saturday, September 21, so be sure to keep that weekend free. We’ll send out more information in the next few weeks, but in the meantime whānau, mark it in your calendars. Hope to see you there.

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Tyrone’s winning message

Tyrone’s winning message

*Another Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō rangatahi doing us proud is Tyrone Bird. Tyrone took out the Pei Te Hurinui Jones Senior Māori section at the Tairāwhiti Ngā Manu Kōrero secondary school speech competition in Ruatōrea late last month. * Tyrone, who attends Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Hawaiki Hou in Turanganui a Kiwa (Gisborne), challenged the use of European teaching in Māori education. He told Māori TV: “For Māori who are consuming European narratives, I say give me the Māori teachings about the void, the night and the world of light so that I may know I have a spirit, stop giving me the narratives of the father, the son and holy ghost,” says Bird. Tyrone will join Te Ao Marama Nepia, who won the Junior Māori section at the Te Tauihu regionals in Picton in May, at the nationals in Te Papaioea (Palmerston North) in September.

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Pahi planning

Pahi planning

Trustees and members of the Trust’s Marae Sub-Committee met at Rotoiti at the end of June to confirm the site for the iwi’ first Pahi. The site selected, in Massey St on land already owned by the iwi, is a short walk from the lake front and further cements the iwi’s close ancestral ties to this very special wahi tapū. Next steps are to go through the necessary planning requirements and develop a set of specifications for the new build.

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Meet Georgia

Meet Georgia

*Next time you call the office, it may well be Georgia Gapper answering the phone. A big welcome to Georgia, who started working with the iwi last month as the office administrator. * Kia ora e te whānau, I’m Georgia Gapper. I am the youngest child of Clive Gapper and one of the many mokopuna of Whawhenga (Lena) Gapper (nee Hemi). I graduated from Marlborough Girls’ College at the end of 2017 and spent a year studying toward a Bachelor of Commerce. But it turned out that wasn’t for me and I made the tough decision to move back to Blenheim so I could think more about what I wanted to do with my life. I’ve spent the past year working fulltime at an accountancy firm, before taking up the administrator role with Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō. I feel really honoured and excited to be working for my iwi, and very thankful that I have the opportunity to do so. If you are ever near the office, make sure you stop in and say ‘hi’. Ngā mihi, Georgia

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Education profile – Lucy Sanson

Education profile – Lucy Sanson

*Lucy Sanson is one of 23 recipients awarded a Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō Trust Education Grant in the 2018 round. * Tēnā koutou e te iwi, Ko Lucy tōku ingoa. Ko Stephen Sanson rāua ko Cathy Prior ōku mātua. I attend Massey University in Palmerston North, where I am in my second year of my Bachelor of Resource and Environmental Planning with a minor in Soil and Earth Science. My interest in studying this stemmed from my experience as a beekeeper in rural Manawatū. Working day to day in a large variety of apiaries allowed me to see the drastic changes in our environment first-hand. I realised that some of the changes I was seeing were irreversible. In my first year of study I expanded my cultural knowledge by taking up a paper called He Tirohanga o Mua: Māori Custom, Lore and Economics. I enjoyed this so much that in my second year I am studying two more Māori-based papers: Mana Māori: Māori and Politics; and Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand Society. I believe these papers as well as...

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Five minutes with ….

*Hinemoa Conner has been a Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō Trustee since 2011, and while she may now live in the Far North, she’s still a West Coast girl at heart.*

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